Saturday, 24 June 2017

Summer TBR [2017]


After several traumatic months of constant revision, and serious deprivation of fresh air, I'm back (again accidentally depriving myself of fresh air by being inside writing this) and am free to read all the books! Slaying the dragons as I had promised in my hiatus, was brutal, and at times incredibly unfair, but I made it through and hope to get to my desired castle come results day. For now, I'm one week into summer and am seriously struggling to adjust to the amount of free time currently within my grasp. So what better than to spend that time reading? I haven't read anything that wasn't for A Levels and college since early March, so many books have accumulated in the since then. Without further ado, here is my Summer 2017 TBR.


Girlhood by Cat Clarke
If you didn't know already, Cat Clarke is one of my favourite authors. Every time a new book of hers is published, I binge read them in a day or two. They're dark, often twisted, and are painfully accurate depictions of real life issues as well as consistently keeping me on the edge of my seat. With Girlhood, I was lucky enough to receive an advance copy of the book a couple of months before publication. Sadly, I hadn't had time to read this, so it has been perched on my TBR stack, waiting to be picked up for a while now; guarenteed to be my first read of the summer. [REVIEW]

The Wrath and the Dawn by Renee Ahdieh
The Wrath and the Dawn is a book that I have spent maybe two years waiting for it to be released in the UK. It did the booktube rounds back in 2015, to rave reviews, and I have desperately wanted it since. Finally, this was published here by Hodder in April, but much to my disappointment, this was really bad. Anyway... moving on!

The End of Mr Y by Scarlett Thomas
This is a book I've been searching for in my specific edition for months. I finally found it in a charity shop in a rare break from revision and it is STUNNING. Admittedly I've never read any of Thomas' fiction, but my eyes have poured themselves over her non-fiction book on writing: Monkeys with Typewriters. The End of Mr Y  is anything like her non-fiction writing, then I reckon I'm going to love this book.

A Closed and Common Orbit by Becky Chambers
As I said in my favourite books of 2016 post, after Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Becky Chambers' first book - The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet - was my favourite book of the year. As someone who has never been into sci-fi, this revolutionised my opinions on the genre entirely. Having met Chambers at a signing just after reading TLWtaSAP, I also got A Closed and Common Orbit, the somewhat sequel, signed at the time, and have been saving it until the summer. I cannot wait to read this.



The Secret History by Donna Tartt
I've tried reading this 600 page book twice before, but the right moment has never quite come. When I first wrote about how I was outgrowing YA, this book was recommended to me countless times. And from what I've read, The Secret History is intense and enthralling, but I just didn't have the time to invest into such a long book at the times I picked this up before now. Now, I have many, many weeks ahead of me, and what better way to spend that time then reading?

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
The Hate U Give rightfully exploded on the internet and the NYT Bestsellers List when it was first published earlier this year, and for very good reason. From the onset, this is going to be a contemporary read like no other, and the kind of read that should've existed before now. But alas, it's finally here and feels like it should be mandatory reading for anyone. In April I was lucky enough to transcribe and blog Angie Thomas' event at a local Waterstones for their teen department, and having spent the entire event swinging between laughing, having epiphanies, and crying, I walked away with a sheer thirst for this book. 



Quiet by Susan Cain
Not much to say on this, really. Fun fact #1: I'm an INFJ and am hugely introverted. Quietness is my comfort zone, although many people can be critical of that. Cain's book is meant to highlight the importance of having introverts in the world, and as a result, this just feels like a book I definitely need to read before starting University in September.

Letters From My Father by Barack Obama
Because we all miss and love Obama...

Naturally, there's also books that in the many long long months of revision that I have added to my TBR but haven't got around to buying. These include: The Crucible by Arthur Miller - because I loved Death of a Salesman at A2, A Conjuring of Light by V.E. Schwab (you have no idea how long I have been waiting to read the final installment in this trilogy), This Savage Song by V.E. Schwab, The Power by Naomi Alderman.

I should probably take the opportunity to note here that these aren't all my unread books. In mid September I'll be moving to University, and whilst my degree will be very book heavy (English Literature student, here), I'd like to take a few books with me for recreational reading, if I get the time - if not, then that's also perfectly okay! This reading list may be subject to change over the course of the summer and will alter once I found out where I'll be doing by degree, because following Results Day you can guarentee I'll be adding books from my reading lists to this pile. Given that I don't - at this point in time - know if I'll be going to be at my first or second choice university, I intend to (if I can) try and cross-reference the reading lists of both universities in order to read anything that comes up on both. 

I'm never very good at sticking to TBRs, as evident by the fact that within a week of summer beginning, I've borrowed seven books I didn't plan on reading from the library. Although it may work for others, I don't believe in conforming myself to a tight TBR unless it's for academic purposes, so whether I'll stick to this or not is questionnable, but eitherway, if there's books left over then I'll just take them to University.

What's on your summer TBR? Let me know in the comments!

Monday, 19 June 2017

REVIEW: Girlhood by Cat Clarke

GirlhoodHarper has tried to forget the past and fit in at expensive boarding school Duncraggan Academy. Her new group of friends are tight; the kind of girls who Harper knows have her back. But Harper can't escape the guilt oYA f her twin sister's Jenna's death, and her own part in it - and she knows noone else will ever really understand. But new girl Kirsty seems to get Harper in ways she never expected. She has lost a sister too. Harper finally feels secure. She finally feels...loved. As if she can grow beyond the person she was when Jenna died. Then Kirsty's behaviour becomes more erratic. Why is her life a perfect mirror of Harper's? And why is she so obsessed with Harper's lost sister? Soon, Harper's closeness with Kirsty begins to threaten her other relationships, and her own sense of identity.

Well then...

If you've been here a while, then you'll know very well that I'm a sucker for any Cat Clarke book. After finishing the Harry Potter series, her books (or at least those which had been published at the time) were a gateway for me into YA fiction. Her books, all of them, are page-turners that can easily be flown through in a couple of days. Clarke keeps you in her grip from start to finish, and never ceases to let you go, even for days after when your reeling from what just occured in 300 pages. Girlhood was no exception to this. This differed from Clarke's former books in many respects - it just had a different tone - but nevertheless, from page one, I knew I was once again being immersed in the words of one of my favourite authors.

The setup for Girlhood will appeal to any reader from the onset: Scottish boarding school surrounded by beautiful landscapes (but as a result very isolated from urbanisation), and a close-knit friendship group where whilst there's beauty on the surface, there are transparent splinterings underneath the surface. Logistically, the actual setting not only appeals to me as Hogwarts alumni and a lover of boarding-school books when I was younger, but it means that the tenseness of these friends can unfold in a manner which is naturalistic, and in the midst of the chaos that unfolds within these pages, creates a faultless eerie atmosphere for the tenser scenes. 

In many respects Girlhood is the perfect YA book. Clarke's books are known for discussing issues that need to be spoken about, or issues that occur in society that we need to be more aware of, such as teenage pregnancy, kidnapping, substance abuse - a more young adult version of Jacqueline Wilson's books if you will, but with an added sprinkle of thriller and mystery. But to top off this excellent formula, this book is incredibly diverse for a boarding school. Girlhood has the diversity we need to see in every YA book. Clarke seemlessly yet with such power pushes the undercurrents of class divides, ethnic diversity, and LGBTQ representation. It was so refreshing to see a lesbian and bisexual pair of roomates who don't end up together, and actively rebel against the assumptions surrounding them that they will. Girlhood criticises societal generic assumptions about LGBTQ+ peoples in a manner that we need to see everywhere, not just in the occasional book. Personally, Clarke's seventh book should be - regardless of genre - the book that every other YA should aspire to be in terms of diversity.

Whilst I did love many aspects of this book, there were problems, some of which may just be personal to me. Having read every one of the author's books, I think I've reached the point where I see the twists coming and usually predict them correctly. Where the plot twists are coming, they should shock me, but instead have little to no effect. This is not a criticism of Clarke's books, because I have devoured and adored each and every one of them, and it isn't something that would be picked up on by the casual reader. I'll of course, continue to purchase and support this amazing author, but Girlhood wasn't the same emotional rollercoaster (that really it should be) as Torn, Entangled and Undone were, just because I've become used to the formula that occurs. 

Overall, the book had an exciting, fast-moving plot, but I feel like the ending was too abrupt for me to be satisfied. Given all the buildup that had been occuring throughout the novel and the disturbing acts that had occured, I was disappointed to see such a sudden reconcilliation after what had happened. The ending was the sole part of Girlhood that felt like a rush to the finish line, rather than wrapping the book up properly and a little more realistically - because I don't think anyone would be that placid in accepting what just unfolded in the plot. Furthermore, because of the way this took place, some seeds of information felt like they were just seeds, rather than points that really could have done with flourishing. As an Anxiety sufferer, I was frustrated by how Ama's Anxiety was briefly mentioned as causing her trouble, but never given any more explanation than that. Instead where something needed to be depicted, it was concealed in order to continue to follow a narrator who seemed to be too ignorant to pick up on what was clearly going on from the start. 

Girlhood is yet another whirlwind of a book from Cat Clarke, who at this point belongs with the writing gods in my eyes. Although I knew what was coming, and saw through every hurdle in the plot, the novel still kept me intrigued from start to finish, and left me with an emptiness of knowing I don't have another new Clarke novel to immerse myself in. It undeniably has its issues, but the portrayals of grief, wealth, sexuality, and the complexities of friendships were tremendous. I like every other reader, wait on baited breath to see what Clarke comes up with next...


Thank you so much to Nina for sending me Girlhood on behalf of Quercus for review. Girlhood was released on 4th May 2017, so go and grab your copies!